Home » Universal Orlando Resort Cuts Ticket Prices for Several Dates With New Variable Ticket Pricing Policy

Universal Orlando Resort Cuts Ticket Prices for Several Dates With New Variable Ticket Pricing Policy

Universal Orlando Resort has been on quite the streak recently when it comes to limited-time deals, introducing additional months for annual pass buyers, a buy-one-get-most-of-2020 free ticket deal for Florida residents, two days free for non-residents, and of course making plenty of in park discounts available for merchandise and food. And now it looks like guests could save even more on a Universal Orlando Resort visit as it has rolled out a new date-based ticket system, similar to the one at Walt Disney World where the day you go determines price, but instead of this new system making most days more expensive, it looks like guests could actually visit for less under most circumstances!

You’ll pay less on value days than current pricing

 

Under Universal’s new dynamic pricing model guests will need to check Universal’s official calendar for prices on any given day. Based on the current calendar, here are some of the ranges for a two-day ticket:

  • A two-day, one-park per day ticket will cost between $110 and $124 per day for non-Florida residents. For reference, the previous price for this ticket was $117.50 per day, which means a substantial savings for guests who visit during the value period. For Florida residents, the pricing falls even lower to between $90 and $99 per day. 
  • A two-day, park-to-park ticket will cost between $140 and $154 per day for non-Florida residents. For reference, the previous price for this ticket was $147.50 per day, which again means a substantial savings for guests who visit during the value period. For Florida residents, the price range is between $114 and $120 per day.

You can view price ranges single day tickets as well as other multi-day options (plus Volcano Bay add-ons) at Universal’s official ticketing site here

Right now it looks like most low-cost visit dates are in August and September, with prices creeping back up in October, November and December closer to the higher end of the spectrum. But we’d guess that as Universal gets a clearer picture in the coming weeks of how attendance will look towards the end of the year, these trends could change.  

It is worth noting also that these ticket prices do not apply to promotional offers. So for instance the 2-Park, 2-Day plus 2 Days Free Promotional Ticket (which can be purchased right now for $278.99 and is good for the rest of 2020)

When guests can use new tickets

Under this new variable ticketing policy, Universal has clarified when guests can use tickets purchased with this new pricing. After purchase, guests with single day tickets must use them on that date, and those with multi-day tickets will have a limited window of time to use the tickets, For two-day tickets, the window is within five days of the selected first date and for three-day tickets, tickets must be used within six days.

Policies for ticket price changes

Universal has also clarified its policies with regards to the new ticket types and changing plans. As always, tickets purchases are non-refundable, but Universal has said that guests who need to change their plans can swap their tickets to a date of equal or lesser price at no fee, or opt for a higher-priced peak date by paying the difference, similar to the policy in effect at Walt Disney World. 

While the change to variable pricing for Universal Orlando Resort was one that many have been predicting for some time now, it looks like Universal will be using this tool not only to control crowds during busier periods, but also to try and attract guests who may be looking for a way to visit the theme parks without spending as much money while the global economy is still recovering from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Though some may balk at the higher ticket prices on Universal’s current ticket calendar, it looks like this new plan gives the resort some much-needed flexibility when it comes to pricing, and we’d be very surprised if Universal doesn’t start adding more value days to the calendar until attendance rebounds to its pre-2020 levels. 

As always, while this situation is evolving, all travelers should check out the CDC’s official site here, which has information on the virus and how to prevent its spread. 

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