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The Top 20 Things You're NOT Allowed to Do at Disney Theme Parks

Two-Gun Mickey

Disney enforces a wide range of rules at its theme parks, from restrictions on what guests can bring in with them to behaviors that are likely to get you ejected. Most of them are fairly obvious, and apply at many other theme park chains, too – but some are a little unexpected, and guests do occasionally fall foul of them.

We think it’s unlikely that many Theme Park Tourist readers will need educating about what they can and can’t do on Disney property. But we still thought it might be fun to round up a list of things that Mickey frowns upon…

20 Go topless

Put your top on

It can get really hot at Disney theme parks, especially those in Florida and California. It doesn’t help that you’re probably racing in an excited state from one attraction to another.

Take your top off to cool down, though, and you’re likely to be immediately approached by a Cast Member and asked to put it back on. Refuse, and you’ll be asked to leave.

The same applies to shoes – Disney wants you to wear them at all times. The exception, of course, is at Walt Disney World’s two water parks, Typhoon Lagoon and Blizzard Beach.

19. Shoot video on a roller coaster

Rock n Roller Coaster

Carrying loose objects onto a roller coaster is a very bad idea. If you drop them, they could strike a fellow rider (or you) at high speed, with devastating results. That’s one reason why Disney forbids video recording on rides such as Rock ‘n’ Roller Coaster and Space Mountain.

You’ll also get into trouble for filming during attractions that feature a lot of copyrighted material, such as Star Tours: The Adventures Continue. You’re unlikely to have a problem capturing footage of your ride on It’s a Small World, however, despite it technically being against the rules.

18. Swear at another guest or Cast Member

No swearing

There are plenty of reasons to get frustrated at Disney parks, such as rides breaking down or other guests cutting in line. Keep your cool, though – if you get abusive with other guests or Cast Members, you’re likely to be removed from the park.

17. Shoot a movie

Escape from Tomorrow

“Videotaping, recording of any kind, broadcast or transmission for commercial purposes” is forbidden at Disney parks. In reality, this isn’t strictly enforced – if you run a theme park website like ours, for example, it’s unlikely that anyone will stop you from filming footage of a new ride, despite it technically being for commercial purposes.

Try and bring in a full-scale film crew, though, and you’ll soon be stopped. That’s why the few non-Disney movies that have been shot at the parks have been filmed largely undercover using amateur equipment.

16. Take flash photos an indoor ride   

No flash photography

It’s not just video recording that’s discouraged on indoor rides. Flash photography can be very annoying to other guests, particularly on atmospheric attractions such as Pirates of the Caribbean.

In our experience, this is one of the rules that is most frequently broken by guests at every Disney resort.

15. Ride a Segway

Segway

Disney explicitly bans "wheeled mobility devices with less than 3 wheels and devices that cannot maintain stability and balance when stopped, unpowered or unoccupied" from its parks. The aim is clear - the company does not want Segways rolling up Main Street, USA.

One woman with muscular dystrophy challenged Disney's ban in court, but a California judge ruled against her. Among the evidence that Disney submitted? That "in 2010, the owner of the company that makes Segways, died when he apparently lost control of his Segway."

14. Ride a skateboard or rollerskate

Bart Simpsons

Thinking of saving on shoe leather and beating the crowds by skating around Disneyland? Think again. The park, along with all other Disney parks, bans skateboards, rollerskates, rollerblades and just about anything else on wheels (with the exception of strollers and wheelchairs).

13. Wield a weapon

Two-Gun Mickey

You may want to defend yourself from Darth Vader, Maleficent or some of the other scarier characters at Disney’s parks – but you’ll have to do so in a non-violent way. Since September 11, Disney has protected its parks with extensive bag searches, and bringing in a knife of any kind (or even worse, a gun) is really not a good idea.

12. Sit on a folding chair

Festival of Fantasy

Waiting to watch one of Disney's parades can be a brutal affair. Families gather an hour or more in advance, lining the pavements of Main Street, USA and waiting in the beating sun for Mickey and his friends to come past.

Wouldn't it be lovely to have a folding chair with you to make that wait more bearable? Tough luck - they aren't allowed. Probably understandably, given the amount of precious room they would take up.

11. Drink your own alcohol

Mickey drinking a beer

Disney may have relaxed its alcohol ban at its theme parks over the years, but that doesn’t mean it’s going to allow you to bring your own in.

Glass containers are also banned, with the exception of baby food jars.

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There are 25 comments.

Can someone explain why the now costume rule exists? I can understand if they say no masks just in case you do something you are not supposed to and they need camera of your face. But why not allow non-face covering costumes? Are they afraid that kids might think a guest is actually a Disney cast member?

Not cast member...character! Imagine if someone showed up in that Snow White costume amd was allowed into MK...then, suddenly, 40 little girls in Princess dresses stampede her way for a photo op and autograph!

To my understanding that is exactly why they do not allow adults to dress in costume. A child might mistaken them for the actual character. Which could cause a ton of trouble. Adults can dress up during Mickey's Not So Scary Halloween Party though.

I think its because of of the autograph thing

Yes, I think that is exactly why. From what I understand, Disney cast members are extensively trained on how to act and what to say and how to treat park guests. They can't have "imposters" running around all over the park that they have no control over. It's an extreme example, but suppose a guy dressed up as Captain Hook started swearing in front of kids? Makes perfect sense to me.

I don't work there or anything (yet), so I won't swear by this or anything, but from what I've been told, that is exactly the fear. Not only are Disney's costumes exquisite, but they train their characters hardcore. If someone were dressed as say Snow White and drinking beer and cussing.....many little kids would be scarred for life. Even if someone were the slightest bit rude, it would reflect poorly on the company. I'm pretty sure that wearing a tutu or disney bounding wouldn't get you kicked out, but it is very tempting to wear even pieces of costumes, especially for people like me (cosplayers and birthday party princesses) who have access to beautiful costumes. At the end of the day, it wouldn't be comfortable to walk around like that all day riding rides and in the sun. Trust me, while hoop skirts, full length gowns, mermaid tails, and ice capes may be fun to try, walking around like that ain't easy. It's my job. I do it for a few hours and I am exhausted afterwords. But I will not deny that it is incredibly fun. I encourage everyone to experiment with costumes, just don't do it at disney!!!

I don't work there or anything (yet), so I won't swear by this or anything, but from what I've been told, that is exactly the fear. Not only are Disney's costumes exquisite, but they train their characters hardcore. If someone were dressed as say Snow White and drinking beer and cussing.....many little kids would be scarred for life. Even if someone were the slightest bit rude, it would reflect poorly on the company. I'm pretty sure that wearing a tutu or disney bounding wouldn't get you kicked out, but it is very tempting to wear even pieces of costumes, especially for people like me (cosplayers and birthday party princesses) who have access to beautiful costumes. At the end of the day, it wouldn't be comfortable to walk around like that all day riding rides and in the sun. Trust me, while hoop skirts, full length gowns, mermaid tails, and ice capes may be fun to try, walking around like that ain't easy. It's my job. I do it for a few hours and I am exhausted afterwords. But I will not deny that it is incredibly fun. I encourage everyone to experiment with costumes, just don't do it at disney!!!

The thing is, people try exactly that. People try to wear costumes in and convince kids they are the characters. And it's impossible to make sure that those who would, would act in an appropriate way. Wouldn't want a fake Cinderella telling children inappropriate things. Also, there's only the one Cinderella, and a fake does confuse the children. Even during Halloween, or other times when you're allowed to wear a costume, you're not allowed to pose for pictures with kids when you have an accurate costume or pretend to be the character.

Yes, that is exactly why adults are banned from wearing costumes inside the parks. There have been incidents where children have thought the visiting costumed adults are park characters and 98% of the time, these adults do not act like the character should. Disney spends a lot of money training their character cast members, not just in how to act as the character, but also how to interact with children. There are standards visiting costumed adults cannot possible adhere too. Also, there was an incident where a visiting costumed adult attempted to kidnap a child and another where a knife was snuck in with the costume. These incidents are not publicly broadcast by Disney, but I have friends who work at the parks and tell me these things. Many other theme and amusement parks have the same regulations listed here, including the costume and tee shirt rules, although the costume rule is lifted during certain Halloween events at different parks.

Wait #15? Disney was where I first learned what a segway is! They had them everywhere at Epcot, and you could try one out.

Because of the lawsuit, they have even done away with the early morning Segway tours. That way there could be no challange, or confusion. The tors were held before regular park opening for safety reasons.

Actually there is still at least one Segway tour on property. I was on the paved trail between DWL and Fort Wilderness last week when I passed a group of a dozen people on a very Disney tour (not a third party). Captured some video as I passed them.

That would be the Wilderness Back Trail Adventure. It starts and ends at Disney's Fort Wilderness Resort and Campgrounds. The Segway tour cost 90 dollars plus tax for just 2 hours. The first half is safety video and demonstration to scare you and the training part to see if you can ride one. We did back in May and it was fun.

I saw a French man take a leak while waiting in line at the Jungle Cruise. He was cuffed and taken away. Hid family stayed in line....lol

Was it Gerard Depardieu?

You all have valid points, but you missed one. I was a Disney world cast member for 2 years. To help with the " Disney Magic ", all characters have a schedule. No two of the same characters is allowed to be in public at the same time. So, if Cinderella is out in public in Disneyland, she will not be seen in any other park during that time.

This is not true. This myth would be impossible to maintain. Entertainment schedules in Disneyland in California are in no way tied to schedules in Walt Disney World in Florida. At Disney World, characters could be viewed at the same time in different parks. For example ... Mickey could be doing a meet n greet at the Studios while appearing on stage at the Magic Kingdom. These two parks are about five miles apart. The part of this myth that is true is that you won't see the same character in public at the same time in the same park. For example ... At the Magic Kingdom, Mickey would not be appearing on stage while driving by in a parade.

not completely true, A Disney character can not be seen in the same place as a double, they are scheduled but only a few characters are a guarantee. They name a spot like "princess room" but will not say who is in the room. That is so they can actually have the characters be in different parks or locations

That's not true at all. I was in Disney Entertainment, friends with many characters ( you know what that means if you were a cast member for 2 years ) for nine years, and I promise you that they would put characters everywhere they could get away with. There were times we would just miss each other when we were out but a parade was coming, or we would almost be able to see each other when we were on opposite ends of the park doing meet and greets. The parade would be going on with one character and that character would also be out somewhere else in the same park. Mickey's house when it used to be at WDW and Mickey's house at Disneyland are prime examples. We're all right next to each other, and you'd never know. Please don't talk about things you don't know.

When I was in MK in March there were 5 women who were all dressed as Cinderella. 3 of them really looked like her as they were blonde (there hair was up as Cinderella's is), all had on the blue dress, long white gloves and one was wearing shoes that looked like the glass slippers. You could tell it was confusing for the little kids because they kept pointing at them and yelling Cinderella. Why was this allowed?

If you are an adult and want to "dress up" try Disneybounding Pinterest was a lot of examples.

i see line jumping all the time. which is not fair at all, if i have to wait in line, i think the other people should to! i see it at thunder mountain snow white and splash mountain. you tell cast members and they do nothing.
cedar point they catch you, or they hear complaits they kick you out and banish you. maybe disney should look into tougher rules

I'm a little surprised and confused about not being allowed to record videos on rides. How did all those people on YouTube get away with it?

This rule is often broken. Many theme parks have this rule, yet someone always seems to get away with it.

Some of these rules are simply untrue.

You CAN shoot video on rollercoasters at Disneyland, you just cannot use a selfie stick.

You CAN wear a costume to the park as long as it's not a Disney character, and is more or less grown-up in nature. Look at Dapper Days. I have gone dressed as Indiana Jones.

You CAN shoot a movie, it just cannot be offensive or dangerous, or involve elaborate camera setups and lighting. There are MANY bloggers who shoot their web videos at Disneyland all the time, even doing documentary blogs.

(Here's just one clip I shot with the help of the Haunted Mansion CM's who allowed me to set up in a roped-off area and eve do rehearsals.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khtaOx9o-W4

As to offensive clothing, I have seen women and men wearing the flimsiest of spandex bike shorts in warm weather, that leave NOTHING to the imagination. Nobody stopped them.

So, these rules are not exactly correct, in some cases.

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