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6 Awful Theme Park Situations That Disney Cast Members See All the Time

4. Inclement weather

Unfavorable weather conditions can happen to theme parks worldwide. In some locations, however, these situations are more common than others. Anaheim, California where Disneyland is located, sees just 33 days of precipitation a year, and annual rainfall averages 13.4 inches. Head to an Orlando theme park and it’s a very different story. The city has an average of 117 days of rain each year, and an annual precipitation over 50 inches. If you visit Orlando in summer, it’s less a question of if it will rain during your visit and more a question of when. Afternoon showers are typically a daily occurrence.

While rain is a minor nuisance, the worst it can cause are some annoying backups in gift shop doorways. It’s what comes with the rain that causes real problems. Florida is the lightning capital of the United States, with 1.45 million strikes each year. If there is lightning anywhere in the vicinity, outdoor attractions at all major theme parks will close until they get the all clear. If you see lightning on the horizon, stick with indoor activities instead.

5. Illness or injury

Dasani Bottled WaterDasani Bottled WaterDrink up to stave off dehydration and related problems

It would be completelyunfair and incorrect to portray theme parks as highly dangerous destinations (in fact, they are quite the opposite), but they’re not without their dangers. 

The best way to protect yourself from injury in a theme park is to be aware of the fact that all the pixie dust in the world won’t save you if you’re doing something dangerous. Many riders who do get injured do so as a result of failing to follow basic safety instructions. Always read through the safety warnings and listen to employees’ warnings.

It’s important to prepare for the strenuous environment of a theme park vacation as well. It’s not at all uncommon for guests to get dehydrated and sunburnt. After getting good and hot and consuming more soda and sugar than good clean water, the natural reaction is often a quick refunding of the last thing you ate. It’s not just the big roller coasters that can cause guests to vomit. Bumping around a bit in a 3-D show can do the trick, and it often does.

Do what you can to stay hydrated and healthy and protect yourself from the elements. If you have to be sick anyway, look for a contained spot off to the side. Throwing up in the bushes may seem like a great way to keep the mess out of the way, but take it from someone who’s cleaned up this type of mess before – it’s not. Flat streets or hard floors make it much easier to take care of the mess. Don’t forget most theme parks have first aid with basic medications like Tylenol if you’re feeling ill and need some help.

6. Guest fights

In a perfect world, all guests would be sweet, polite, and full of sunshine. Many of them are. Unfortunately, long days, lack of sleep, and uncomfortable conditions can cause tempers to flare. Particularly hot and humid days have seen multiple fights break out between guests within a single day. While confrontations are handled as diplomatically as possible by park security, you could be asked to leave the park if things get too out of hand. Do your best to stay out of these kinds of confrontations yourself so you can enjoy the best vacation possible.

Park employees could easily see several or even all of these situations happen in a single busy day. Try not to view a few unfortunate incidents as a sign of a failed vacation. Things like this can happen more frequently than you expect, but there are almost always things you can do to salvage the situation and still make the most of your day.

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